18 Jul

WVU Tech was recently awarded a Noel-Levitz Marketing-Recruitment Excellence Award during the National Conference on Student Recruitment, Marketing and Retention in Chicago, Illinois.

The award recognized the university’s 2012-2013 recruitment campaign, which garnered a 45 percent increase in applications, a 53 percent increase in first-time freshman students and a 10 percent increase in overall enrollment in 2013.

Noel-Levitz cited the development of a comprehensive recruitment plan, the successful launch of the Student Success Center and college-wide support of enrollment growth as contributing factors to the successful campaign.

“Recruitment and retention at WVU Tech are truly campus-wide efforts,” said WVU Tech Dean of Enrollment, Bill Allen. “We thank Noel-Levitz for their recognition and, with the support of all our student-focused departments, we’re excited to carry this momentum into the new academic year.”

WVU Tech admissions staff traveled to Chicago to attend the conference and accept the award.

Noel-Levitz is a consulting firm that provides research and services in student recruitment and retention, financial aid, publications and web development.

9 Jul

The State Journal – Tuesday, July 8, 2014
by Sarah Tincher, Energy Reporter

The American Electric Power Foundation has donated $50,000 to West Virginia University and the WVU Institute of Technology for science, technology, engineering and math summer camps.

The gift will cover some housing and board expenses, as well as some scholarship opportunities for students who face financial challenges, for the Engineering Challenge Camps at WVU and Camp STEM at WVU Tech. The camps will allow students to discover a field they are passionate about and possibly hope to pursue a career in.

“We’re happy to partner with WVU and WVU Tech on this STEM program. At Appalachian Power, we need employees with good math and science skills for many if not most of our jobs,” said Charles Patton, president and chief operating officer of Appalachian Power, an AEP subsidiary. “From engineering to customer service, STEM skills are critical for success. WVU and WVU Tech are helping create a well-educated work force that will build a better future for West Virginia.”

WVU and WVU Tech officials say that introducing STEM disciplines at an early age will improve high school graduation rates and help ensure that students are ready for college by giving them a glimpse into the college experience.

WVU Tech attracts about 60 students from across the state to Camp STEM’s location in Montgomery.

“We’re grateful for American Electric Power Foundation’s support as it allowed us to expand Camp STEM. This summer program is a vital opportunity for West Virginia high school students to explore STEM fields and see themselves as future scientists and engineers,” said Zeljko Torbica, dean of the Leonard C. Nelson College of Engineering and Sciences at WVU Tech.

To find out more about the camps, visit the WVU and WVU Tech websites.

State Journal article: http://www.statejournal.com/story/25964900/aep-foundation-donates-50000-to-wvu-and-wvu-tech-stem-camps

26 Jun

Charleston Daily Mail – Thursday, June 26, 2014
Editorial: WVU Tech may be the best choice of all

Despite a slow job market and ever-increasing student loans, college is still a good investment, according to a new report by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Even if a job does not require a college degree, an employee is better off with one, the study found.

When it comes to higher education, the return on investment depends on the college chosen and the major studied. Harvard and other Ivy League colleges offer great returns on their investment, of course. Not only are the degrees prestigious, but the network of their graduates is stellar.

However, Forbes found, the best investment in the country is Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, Calif., which has fewer than 1,000 students. Its mission is to educate engineers, scientists, and mathematicians, who are well-versed in the humanities and the social sciences as well.

Forbes magazine found Harvey Mudd graduates typically receive a starting salary of $73,300 a year. Forbes calculated the return on investment over 20 years as $980,900.

That bested No. 2 Cal Tech ($837,600), No. 13 Princeton ($690,800) and No. 23 Harvard ($650,100).

However, one does not have to travel across the country to do well by college. West Virginia University Institute of Technology in Montgomery ranked in the top 10 percent. Its graduates can expect a starting salary of $52,200 a year and a 20-year return of investment of $452,200.

That topped No. 314 WVU ($311,600) and No. 878 Marshall ($154,300).

Two factors make the return at WVU-Tech so high, spokeswoman Jen Wood Cunningham told the Daily Mail’s Whitney Burdette.

The cost of attendance is low and the students pursue degrees in chemical, electrical, software and project engineers. The demand for engineers is much higher than say, English majors, which explains the difference.

The school also has a good reputation.

“We’ve been told by employers that with our graduates, they don’t have to do a two- or three-year training program to get them where they need to be,” Cunningham said. “Our graduates are ready when they graduate. They’re ready to start day one.”

Engineers from WVU, Marshall and other state schools can expect the same salaries and a similar rate of return.

West Virginia high school students should think about staying in state—especially if they qualify for four years of free or nearly free tuition from Promise scholarships.

Regardless of school choice, an investment in a two-year or four-year higher education is one that pays off well in the long run.

Charleston Daily Mail editorial: http://www.charlestondailymail.com/article/20140626/DM04/140629538

25 Jun
Camp STEM 2014

Last week, WVU Tech hosted 70 area high school students for Camp STEM. Made possible by generous contributions from AT&T, Toyota, DOW and the American Electric Power Foundation, the camp offered students a chance to explore fields such as robotics, biology, forensics, engineering, computer programming, math, chemistry and automobile technology.

“Businesses in West Virginia and around the country need a capable and diverse pipeline of employees to fuel 21st century jobs. Today, the need is outpacing their availability,” said J. Michael Schweder, president, AT&T-Mid Atlantic. “Camp STEM is a great way to introduce high school students to the many career opportunities that require STEM skills. The program prepares the state’s next generation of technology leaders.”

During the week-long camp, attendees participated in interactive classes where they manipulated genes in bacteria, created electrical circuits, documented mock crime scenes, built lasers, programmed basic computer games or found out what it takes to build a bridge.

DOW employees provided an interactive chemistry presentation and students worked in teams on the camp’s final project, the cardboard canoe. AT&T and DOW representatives judged Friday evening’s competition, which challenged students to design and build a cardboard canoe capable of ferrying a student across the WVU Tech swimming pool.

Attendees also visited the Green Bank Telescope and Cass Scenic Railroad State Park.

This year, Camp STEM welcomed a group of Toyota Scholars – high school girls interested in studying STEM fields – that attended the camp on Toyota-sponsored scholarships.

“There is no better time than now for ambitious students to enter STEM-related fields as demand across our country rises in many areas,” said Millie Marshall, president of Toyota West Virginia. “I learned early in my Toyota career about the importance of STEM and how it helps us continuously improve our safety and quality. I encourage students who are interested in STEM fields to learn the fundamentals, hone their skills and seek a mentor who can always help you improve. There’s no best way; only a better way of doing things.”

View coverage of WVU Tech’s Camp STEM from the Charleston Gazette and WOWK-TV 13.

Check out photos from Camp STEM on the WVU Tech Flickr page.

25 Jun

WOWK TV – June 24, 2014
By Hillary Hall, WOWK TV

MONTGOMERY, WV – Hair cells, blood spatter, and fingerprints…things that are more likely to be found at a crime scene than a summer camp. The STEM program held at West Virginia Tech is a little bit different than your run of the mill camp for high school students.

STEM, or Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, is a program designed to give high school students across West Virginia a hands on experience with jobs related to those topics. They get to work in forensics, engineering, computer programming, math, and science for an entire week. An experience hoped to lead them to a future job in one of those fields. “They don’t know what an engineer does or what a mathematician does, this lets them apply the things they are learning in school in a real world environment” say first year engineering and science director at WVU Tech Dr. Kimberlyn Gray. She feels that more interest in STEM will lead to job growth in West Virginia in the future.

The students at the summer camp seem to enjoy the unique things they are getting to do. Tarryn Walker from Oak Hill High School in Fayette County said “you are learning but its not like it is in school” he went on to say that “you could never get to do something like this in a normal classroom”.

The camp is made possible by donations from AT&T, DOW, AEP [American Electric Power Foundation], and Toyota. Some students are also at the camp on scholarships from other organizations.

The camp runs through Friday, June 27th. It’s too late to apply for this years camp, but if you are interested in applying for next year please visit http://campstem.wvutech.edu/.

WOWK 13
25 Jun

Charleston Daily Mail – Tuesday, June 24, 2014

by Whitney Burdette, Capitol reporter

Students graduating from West Virginia University Institute of Technology can expect an average 20-year return on investment of more than $450,000.

The Montgomery school was recently recognized by Payscale’s 2014 College Return on Investment Report and ranked in the top 10 percent of public schools across the country for students paying in-state tuition. Tech graduates have the highest overall return on investment of any school in West Virginia. Payscale collects and reviews compensation data and releases an annual report ranking institutions based on financial gains graduates can expect to see with a bachelor’s degree from that college or university.

Jen Wood Cunningham, interim director of university relations for WVU-Tech, said the high return on investment is because of two things.

“Our cost of attendance is really low, especially for the value of the degrees they receive,” Cunningham said. “Our degrees are really sought after by employers in the industries, especially the STEM fields. We really attribute that to low cost of attendance and the quality of education they receive and (graduates) having an employable degree to get a high paying job after they graduate.”

WVU-Tech has a long tradition of educating engineering students, and that’s reflected in the Payscale data. According to the report, Tech graduates average a starting salary of $52,200 and most pursue degrees in chemical, electrical, software and project engineering. Careers in those fields pay a median of $55,000 or more.

Cunningham said students pursuing those types of degrees from Tech are at an advantage. The school partners with employers for a cooperative education program as well as internships.

“We’ve been told by employers that with our graduates, they don’t have to do a 2-3 year training program to get them where they need to be,” Cunningham said. “Our graduates are ready when they graduate. They’re ready to start day one.”

Tech has made strides in recent years to revitalize both student services and its physical appearance. The revitalization plan was put in action after a 2011 report to the state Legislature criticized academic, structural and financial issues with the school. Since then, millions of dollars have been spent to improve the campus, including adding wireless Internet and a Student Success Center. Carolyn Long, WVU-Tech president, said those improvements have helped create an environment where students can reach their potential.

“This report shows what we already know — that an education from WVU-Tech is a worthwhile endeavor,” she said in a news release. “Our graduates are seeing more than financial benefits. Our students are educated in an inclusive and supportive environment that creates knowledgeable and civic-minded graduates.”

WVU ranked second on the list, with an ROI of 8.8 percent for in-state students, Fairmont State University ranked third with 6.3 percent, Marshall University ranked fourth at 5.7 percent and West Liberty State University rounded out the list at 5.2 percent return on investment for in-state students. Return on investment for out-of-state students is ranked somewhat differently, with WVU-Tech and WVU coming in at first and second with 8.1 and 5.9 percent, respectively, Fairmont State at 4.7 percent, Marshall at 3.8 percent and West Liberty at 2.4 percent.

Cunningham said she wants prospective students, parents and potential donors who analyze the report to know that a good education is available at Tech.

“I think the main takeaway is our school is providing a high quality education in West Virginia for students to compete globally within the STEM fields and a variety of other fields including forensic investigation and criminal justice,” she said.

“We really want to make sure we’re showing we’re part of the WVU system. We were No. 1 and WVU was No. 2. between the two of us, the WVU system is the highest level of return on investment you can get in West Virginia.”

Article on Charleston Daily Mail http://www.charlestondailymail.com/article/20140624/DM01/140629648/1276

24 Jun

STEM branches out: Camp broadens students

Jennifer | June 24th, 2014

Charleston Gazette – Monday, June 23, 2014
by Mackenzie Mays, Staff writer

Blood was splattered on the wall.

The footprints linked back to a size-10 pair of Reeboks.

The scene was the West Virginia University Institute of Technology.

But there was no real crime — it was a forensic science course on Monday afternoon as part of WVU-Tech’s Camp STEM.

“That’s one of my favorite parts — the gory stuff,” said Teagan Waugh, a 14-year-old from Princeton.

Waugh was among about 70 high school students from across the state at the week-long camp on the Tech campus, where faculty teach a range of courses from biomedical engineering and “unusual chemistry” to auto repair and computer science.

The camp is sponsored by such companies as AT&T, Toyota and Dow and is an attempt to get more young people interested in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields of study while also giving them a glimpse into the college experience.

For Waugh, who wants to major in forensic science when she goes off to college in a few years, it doesn’t take much convincing.

“I don’t want to have one of those boring, typical office jobs,” she said. “I really love math, but most kids don’t. I think fun camps like this can change that.”

That’s the goal, said Camp STEM director Kimberlyn Gray.

“We’re doing more and more in the STEM fields. Engineering is still one of those fields where we’re retiring more people than we’re graduating. We’re holding more and more up in the sciences, but the interest rates in those fields is still hovering around 4 to 5 percent,” Gray said. “It’s something I think that people don’t know what it is, and it’s hard to get interested in it because they don’t see it.

“So we’re trying to provide them more opportunities to do those things,” Gray said.

Twenty classes are offered during the camp, and students are encouraged to try as many out as they can, regardless of their preferences, Gray said.

“This isn’t something that’s easy to experience. They’re not subjects. Outside of biology and chemistry, [students] don’t really get to see that in high school. And I think that’s why this is a really good thing,” she said.

Millie Marshall, president of Toyota West Virginia, which is also a sponsor of the summer program, said getting young students interested in STEM fields is a way to improve the state as a whole.

“There is no better time than now for ambitious students to enter STEM-related fields as demand across our country rises in many areas,” Marshall said. “I learned early in my Toyota career about the importance of STEM and how it helps us continuously improve our safety and quality. I encourage students who are interested in STEM fields to learn the fundamentals, hone their skills and seek a mentor who can always help you improve. There’s no best way — only a better way of doing things.”

The camp ends Friday with a final project that will challenge students to design and build a cardboard canoe that can carry a student across the WVU-Tech swimming pool.

For more information on the camp, visit www.wvutech.edu.

Charleston Gazette Article: http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20140623/GZ01/140629761/1101

23 Jun

WCHS TV – June 23, 2014

MONTGOMERY, WV – High school students from around the state are at West Virginia University Institute of Technology in Montgomery this week exploring science, technology, engineering and mathematics through hands-on activities.

The camp offers students a chance to explore fields such as robotics, biology, forensics, civil and electrical engineering, computer programming, mathematics, chemistry and automobile technology, according to a news release from the university.

During the week-long camp, attendees participate in interactive, hands-on classes where they will manipulate genes in bacteria, create electrical circuits, document mock crime scenes, build lasers, program basic computer games, learn about EEGs or find out what it takes to build a bridge.

Dow employees will provide an interactive chemistry presentation and students will work in teams on the camp’s final project, the cardboard canoe. AT&T and DOW representatives will judge the competition, which challenges students to design and build a cardboard canoe that can carry a student across the WVU Tech swimming pool.

Camp attendees also will take a day-long field trip to visit the Green Bank Telescope and the Cass Scenic Railroad State Park.

This year, Camp STEM will welcome a group of Toyota Scholars – high school girls who are interested in studying STEM fields and will attend the camp on Toyota-sponsored scholarships.

The camp is made possible by contributions from AT&T, Toyota, DOW and AEP [American Electric Power Foundation].

23 Jun

WVU Tech students enrolled in 6 or more credit hours beginning Fall 2014 will be automatically enrolled in the WVU Aetna Student Health Insurance Plan. However, students who are already covered under a parent’s or spouse’s health insurance policy – or who have adequate health insurance coverage via another plan, including plans purchased through the West Virginia Insurance Exchange – may waive the student health insurance plan by answering a few simple questions.

The Student Health Insurance Waiver Application site is active and can be accessed at studentinsurance.wvu.edu.

Waiver applications must be completed NO LATER THAN August 8, 2014. Waiver applications will not be accepted after August 8, 2014.

For questions and complete information about student health insurance for WVU Tech students, please review the WVU Student Health Insurance website at studentinsurance.wvu.edu or contact the WVU Student Insurance Office at sio@mail.wvu.edu or 304.293.6815.

23 Jun
Optimized-Little Stars Group Shot 1

This week, 50 young basketball players will meet in Montgomery for the 2014 Little Stars Basketball Camp at the WVU Tech Baisi Athletic Center. Open to boys and girls ages 6-15, the camp runs from Monday, June 23 until Friday, June 27.

The camp offers basic individual improvement drills and features 3-on-3 play and 5-on-5 play in addition to 3-point and free-throw competitions for prizes. Attendees will focus on fundamentals such as shooting, dribbling and passing, defense and on-court attitude. Each camper will receive a basketball, Little Stars t-shirt, trophy, player photo and evaluation.

“We’re looking forward to the Little Stars Basketball Camp this summer. We enjoy working with youngsters to improve their knowledge and skills, and we promote a positive attitude that helps young players become winners on and off the court,” said camp director and WVU Tech men’s basketball head coach, Bob Williams.

Williams has coached the WVU Tech men’s basketball team for 12 seasons where he led the Golden Bears in a 2012 Mid-South Conference Championship season, posted back-to-back 20-win seasons from 2011 – 2013, and was named Mid-South Conference “Coach of the Year” in 2009. At camp, Coach Williams will be joined by assistant men’s basketball coach David Rawlinson (All-American ‘13), WVU Tech men’s basketball players and area coaches.

Camp days will run from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m., Monday through Thursday and 9 a.m. until 12 p.m. on Friday.

[Photo: 2014 Little Stars Basketball Camp attendees and staff gather for a group shot.]


UPDATE – June 29, 2014

Check out photos from this year’s camp on the WVU Tech Flickr page.

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